Sodium flouroacetate residue in feral pigs (Sus scrofa carcasses – is it a significant secondary poisoning hazard?

Feral pig control in Australia is heavily reliant upon poisoning with sodium fluoroacetate (1080) bait. Tissue residue levels may be considerable and pose a potential risk to non-target consumers. Tissue/fluid samples (liver, kidney, stomach, stomach contents, small intestine, large intestine, muscle and eye) from lethally poisoned feral pigs were removed and assayed for fluoroacetate concentration. The digestive system, specifically the stomach contents and the stomach, consistently contained the greatest concentration of 1080 within individuals. Few non-target animals apart from introduced mammals (fox, dog, cat) appear at risk from consuming muscle tissue, however, many native species may be at risk from consuming visceral tissue (especially stomach and contents). The practical risk is probably low and reduced given the rapid decomposition of carcasses in the field. Regular consumption of poisoned pork may exceed the recommended daily intake of fluoroacetate and be a risk to human health, but there is a low probability of this occurring.

Author Gentle, M., Elsworth, P. and Parker, B.
Date 2005-05-02
Year 2005
Secondary title 13th Australasian Vertebrate Pest Conference
Place published Wellington, NZ
Publisher Landcare Research
Institution QLD Department of Natural Resources & Mines
Pages 143-147
Control method 1080 (sodium monofluoroacetate)
Region Australia - national
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