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Baiting of feral cats with para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP)

At the time of writing there is no nationally agreed upon level Standard Operating Procedure for baiting of feral cats with para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP). The APVMA Curiosity® label contains directions for use and the CAT004 Standard Operating Procedure: Baiting of feral cats with para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP, see below) gives additional directions for use. Restrictions apply to where you can use feral cat baits, so you need to contact the relevant jurisdiction where the baits are being deployed to get further information.

Poison baiting is the only effective form of feral cat control over larger areas. Properly implemented baiting programs can achieve rapid knockdowns of feral cat populations across landscape scales. Baiting with PAPP is best used in a strategic manner as part of a co-ordinated program designed to achieve sustained effective control. Restrictions apply to where you can use feral cat baits.

Baiting of feral cats with CURIOSITY® PAPP baits is undertaken as part of feral animal control programs in national parks, reserves, and private lands. It is conducted by authorised officers including government staff, landholders, pest control officers, and professional contractors.

CURIOSITY® is the only bait containing the toxin para aminopropiophenone (PAPP) which is currently nationally registered for use on feral cats with the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) and is permitted for use by Authorised Control Officers and authorised persons for feral cat control in some states. Curiosity® development was led by the Commonwealth in partnership with the Victorian and Western Australian Governments. Curiosity® baits are available from Tréidlia Biovet Pty Ltd under a licencing arrangement with the Commonwealth.

Curiosity® baits deliver a PAPP formulation within a robust acid-soluble polymer pellet, known as the hard shell delivery vehicle (HSDV) to reduce the impacts to non-target wildlife. A single HSDV contains sufficient PAPP to kill a single cat. It is then incorporated into a moist sausage shaped meat bait. Feral cats are amongst the most susceptible species to the effects of PAPP. The use of a HSDV helps to minimise the exposure of non-target species to the toxin by exploiting differences in the teeth and feeding behaviours between cats and native wildlife.

Poisoned baits are distributed either from the air by helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft or on-ground by hand. Feral cats rarely unearth buried baits so baits must be deployed on the ground surface and at a density of 50 baits/km2 to ensure the cats will encounter a bait when they are hungry.

The 2020 Standard Operating Procedure Baiting of feral cats with para-aminopropiophenone should be read in conjunction with the overarching Model code of practice for the humane control of feral cats, to ensure that the most appropriate combination of pest control techniques are selected and deployed to achieve rapid and sustained reduction of pest animal populations and impacts.

The SOP is a guide only; it does not replace or override the legislation that applies in the relevant state or territory jurisdiction. The SOP should only be used subject to the applicable legal requirements (including WH&S) in the relevant jurisdiction where the baits are being deployed.

DOWNLOAD Standard Operating Procedure: Baiting of feral cats with para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP) 2020.

Disclaimer
The information contained in this publication has been prepared with care and is based on knowledge and understanding at the time of writing. Some of the information in this document is provided by third parties, and all information is provided “as is”, without warranty of any kind, to the extent permitted by law. After publication, circumstances may change and before relying on this information the user needs to take care to update as necessary.

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It is important to connect with the relevant government authorities to ensure you have the right permits in place before undertaking feral cat management.

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Further information

Algar D, Hamilton N, Onus M, Hilmer S, Comer S, Tiller C, Bell L, Pinder J, Adams E, Butler S (2011) ‘Field trial to compare baiting efficacy of Eradicat® and Curiosity® baits.’ Woodvale, Western Australia. https://www.dcceew.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/cat-bait-wa.pdf

Buckmaster T, Dickman CR, Johnston MJ (2014). Assessing Risks to Non-Target Species During Poison Baiting Programs for Feral Cats. PLoS ONE 9(9): e107788. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0107788&type=printable

Department of Climate Change Energy, the Environment and Water (2021). Curiosity® bait for feral cats. https://www.dcceew.gov.au/environment/invasive-species/feral-animals-australia/feral-cats/curiosity-bait

Johnston M (2012). Field assessment of the Curiosity® bait for management of Feral Cats after fire at Wilsons Promontory National Park. Department of Sustainability and Environment. Victorian Government. Heidelberg, Victoria. https://www.ari.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0025/34963/VBRRA-P20-web-rev.pdf

Johnston M, Bould L, O’Donoghue M, Holdsworth M, Marmion P, Bilney R, Reside AE, Caldwell D, R G, Gentles T (2014) ‘Field efficacy of the Curiosity® bait for management of a feral cat population at Roxby Downs, South Australia.’ Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research Technical Report Series No. 253. Department of Environment and Primary Industries, Heidelberg, Victoria. https://www.dcceew.gov.au/environment/invasive-species/publications/field-efficacy-curiosity-bait-management-feral-cat-population-roxby-downs

Johnston M, O’Donoghue M, Holdsworth M, Robinson S, Herrod A, Eklom K, Gigliotti F, Bould L, Little N (2013) ‘Field assessment of the Curiosity® bait for management of feral cats in the Pilbara.’ Rylah Institute for Environmental Research Technical Report Series No. 245. Department of Environment and Primary Industries, Heidelberg, Victoria. https://www.dcceew.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/curiosity-karijini-national-park.pdf

Hohnen R, Smith J, Mulvaney J, Evans T, Mooney T (2022) Impacts of ‘Curiosity’ baiting on feral cat populations in woodland habitats of Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Wildlife Research 49, 637-645. https://doi.org/10.1071/WR21090

How to reference this page:

Basnett G, Nelson T, Hugo A, 2023. Baiting of feral cats with para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP). Toolkit Resource. PestSmart website. https://pestsmart.org.au/toolkit-resource/baiting-of-feral-cats-with-papp accessed 17-04-2024